Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is the difference between CD/DVD's (CD/DVD-ROM's, Replication) and CD/DVD-R's (CD/DVD - Recordables, Duplication)?
  2. What is a DVD and how are they different from CD's?
  3. What are DVD-Video, DVD-Audio and DVD-ROM?
  4. How much data can a DVD hold?
  5. What Are Regional DVD Codes?
  6. What do you do to create a DVD?
  7. When do you use CD/DVD-ROM's versus using CD/DVD-R's?
  8. What is a "One-Off," "Master CD," or "Gold Master?"
  9. What does the term "Glass Mastering" mean?
  10. What does the term "Authoring" mean?
  11. Where can I get the templates or specifications for the silkscreening of CD/DVD-ROM's, or for items such as Jewel Case Inserts or your "Simple Sleeve"?
  12. Why do you still need to create film for silkscreening?
  13. Can you silkscreen CD/DVD's in either 4/c process and PMS colors?
  14. When do you need a white flood coat on a CD/DVD prior to silkscreening and is this a 5th color?
  15. What is your turnaround time?
  16. How should I submit artwork files?
  17. What is your minimum order?
  18. How do I start an order?

  19. *Graphic Arts Tips:


1. What is the difference between CD/DVD's (CD/DVD-ROM's, Replication) and CD/DVD-R's (CD/DVD - Recordables, Duplication)?

   First, CD/DVD-ROM's and CD/DVD-R's function exactly the same in a drive. Basically, CD/DVD-ROM's are injection-molded polycarbonate plastic with the data molded into the surface at the point of manufacture. CD/DVD-R's are pre-manufactured blank CD/DVD's. CD/DVD's are read by a laser beam inside a device detecting highs and lows on the disk's surface. This is why the data can be molded into the surface and why, once the data is there, it cannot be changed or modified in any way. CD/DVD-R's have a reflective surface, which can be silver, blue, or green, which has the capability to be removed where necessary by the high-intensiy laser in a CD/DVD-R writer. This removal of the silver reflective surface is called "burning" a CD. The CD/DVD reader then reads the highs and lows created by the "burning" process just the same as it reads the highs and lows that are already molded into the CD/DVD-ROM.

Fun Fact: The information on CD/DVD actually starts at the center and is spiraled out in a single line of data from the center, very similar to the way a 45 or 33-1/3RPM record was made.

2. What is a DVD and how are they different from CD's?

   In simple terms, a DVD (Digital Video Disk) is very similar in size and appearance to a CD. The principle difference is that, due to improvements in technology, data can be recorded on both sides of the DVD and can also be recorded on two different layers on each side. This allows for massive amounts of data to be stored on a DVD. A regular CD can have roughly 650MB of data whereas DVD's can store anywhere from 4.7GB to 17GB of information, depending on how may sides and layers are utilized. Currently the primary usage of DVD's is for video applications due to the massive amounts of space needed to hold digital videos.

3. What are DVD-Video, DVD-Audio and DVD-ROM?

   • DVD-Video contains video programs and is primarily viewed on TV.
   • DVD-Audio can provide higher quality stereo than CD and can be played on home decks, car and       portable players.
   • DVD-ROM contains computer data. It works much like a high capacity CD-ROM and is used almost       exclusively in computers.

4. How much data can a DVD hold?

The DVD-ROM has four main capacities:
  • DVD-5: single sided/single layer (4.7GB)
  • DVD-9: single sided/dual layer (8.5GB)
  • DVD-10: double sided/single layer (9.4GB)
  • DVD-18: double sided/dual layer (17GB)

5. What Are Regional DVD Codes?

   Regional DVD codes are used to prevent playback of discs in various geographical regions. These codes are mostly supported by the movie industry and rarely used outside of it.

There are 8 regional DVD codes:
  1. U.S., Canada, U.S. Territories
  2. Europe, South Africa, Japan, and Middle East
  3. Southeast Asia and East Asia
  4. Central America, South America, Caribbean, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, and Pacific Islands
  5. Africa, Eastern Europe, Indian, North Korea, and Mongolia
  6. China
  7. Reserved
  8. Special venues (airplanes, cruise ships, etc.)

6. What do you do to create a DVD?

   The creation of a DVD can be simple or complicated, subject to your goals. In general, you need to collect, create and capture video, audio and data assets. The video and audio data is then compressed using software and a computer with an MPEG-2 encoder. Next menus, titles, submenus, subtitles and audio tracks are multiplexed. A DVD-R master is then created. Finally, mastering and pressing of the discs are done in a manufacturing process similar to the creation of CDs.

7. When do you use CD/DVD-ROM's versus using CD/DVD-R's?

   First, CD/DVD-ROM's and CD/DVD-R's function exactly the same in a drive. In general you use CD/DVD-ROM's any time you need roughly 500 or more copies of a CD/DVD. If you need less than 500 copies, you should consider CD/DVD-R's, which MAY be more cost effective depending on the quantity needed. For example, from a total cash outlay standpoint, the dollars spent for 100 CD/DVD-R's is considerably less than you would pay for a minimum order of 1,000 CD/DVD-ROM's.

8. What is a "One-Off," "Master CD," or "Gold Master?"

   All of these terms mean the same thing. Which term is used is based on individual preference. These are nothing more than a CD/DVD-R which contains the final version of the information to be replicated. This is what we start the replication process from.

9. What does the term "Glass Mastering" mean?

   Glass Mastering is the first part of the process needed to make the "metal stamper" that is put into the injection molding machine to produce the CD/DVD-ROM's. The first part of the process is to convert the data into the highs and lows that will be put onto the surface of the CD/DVD which is actually done on a piece of glass.

10. What does the term "Authoring" mean?

   Authoring is the word used for taking the data and getting it into a format which is readable when you put the CD/DVD into a drive. In other words, there are programs and formats which the person who creates the CD/DVD uses to make the data actually usable. For example, if you want to be able to search for something on the CD/DVD, an "Author" has to include the software to perform the search as well as the data itself. Failsafe does not provide this service. Normally it's provided by the customer from their internal resources or they hire an individual to put it together for them. We require a finished product on a CD/DVD-R ready for replication. For example, we are often asked to take a video clip and put it on a CD/DVD. The video must be put into and MPEG-2 format by an "Author." As was mentioned before, Failsafe does not provide that service.

11. Where can I get the templates or specifications for the silkscreening of CD/DVD-ROM's, or for items such as Jewel Case Inserts or your "Simple Sleeve"?

   The templates and print specifications for many of our frequently used items such as CD/DVD-ROM's, CD/DVD-R's, Jewel Case Inserts, the "Simple Sleeve," and other items can be found on our website at www.failsafeinc.com/templates. Please share this information with any graphic artists you may be working with as they can find these helpful and informative.

12. Why do you still need to create film for silkscreening?

   Film is still needed to make the screens for the silkscreen process just like you need film to create the plates for conventional, non direct-to-plate, offset printing.

13. Can you silkscreen CD/DVD's in either 4/c process and PMS colors?

   Yes, we can do them either way!

14. When do you need a white flood coat on a CD/DVD prior to silkscreening and is this a 5th color?

   It is not NECESSARY to have a flood coat on any CD/DVD's, however, the flood coat will have a tendency to make a 4/c process job have truer colors as the ink is being laid down over white versus the silver background that is already there. You may get a color shift when using the darker silver color background but many CD/DVD's are designed to have the silver show through. If it is important to the customer that the CD/DVD be as close as possible to the coloration of printed material, then we suggest you request the white flood coat. The white coat is a 5th color, however, it is becoming very common today and really does not effect your pricing beyond the normal charge of any 4/c job.

15. What is your turnaround time?

   Turn times can vary greatly depending on the product ordered, and what is happening when your order is placed. Typical turn time for bulk discs and stock packaging items is 5-7 working days. For our most popular custom printed items you can add another 5-7 working days. If you’re looking for something unique the range can be anywhere from 3 weeks, to 3 months depending on exactly what you’re needs are. We’re always here to try and meet your needs, whatever they may be so if you need a quicker turn don’t hesitate to ask.

16. How should I submit artwork files?

   Artwork can be submitted by sending in a disc, via email, or by ftp upload. If you would like to use our ftp please contact your representative so we can get you setup with a user name and password.

17. What is your minimum order?

   We don’t have a minimum. We can handle anything from ten to ten million. However, our minimum for replicated discs is 1000 pcs.

18. How do I start an order?

   Call Failsafe Media to speak with a CD/DVD replication specialist:

   ☎ 800.537.1919

   Request a Quote Form.

   Fill out our online request a quote form and a CD/DVD replication specialist will contact you shortly.



*Graphic Arts Tips:

a. Please let graphic artists know to be careful using gradient screens as they often do not translate well to silkscreening. Sometimes there will be a visible line instead of a smooth change of coloration.

b. Also, if the graphic artist has not done CD/DVD artwork before, they need to have a screen value of 15% to 85% or it will not show up properly when the CD/DVD is silkscreened. This is another quirk of translating normal printing graphics to silkscreening.

c. Please note that artwork for a CD/DVD will seldom look exactly like any companion printed material even if both the CD/DVD artwork and printed materials are in 4/c process. Silkscreening is done normally at 85-100 line screen with ink going onto a hard surface versus the normal 133-150 line screen for traditional offset printing on paper.

d. Please remember, you can also direct the graphic artist to this webpage (www.failsafeinc.com/templates) for more templates and specifications.

 

 

 

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